POSITIVE STUDENT PROFILES & GOALS- AT- A- GLANCE  
Positive Student Profile

SAMPLE Positive Student Profile for Brian, age 11  

SAMPLE Positive Student Profile for Christina, age 19

GOALS- AT- A- GLANCE

SAMPLE GOALS- AT- A- GLANCE for Brian, age 11

IEP Goal - Activity Matrix
SAMPLE IEP Goal- Activity Matrix for Brian, age 11
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APPENDIX C

POSITIVE STUDENT PROFILES & GOALS-AT-A-GLANCE  

 


Positive Student Profile

This form is to be filled out by the parent to provide a "snapshot" of your child that should be reflected in his/her IEP.

1.    Who is  ____________?

      (Describe your child, including information such as place in family, personality, likes and dislikes.)

2.    What are ___________'s strengths?

      (Highlight all areas in which your child does well, including educational and social environments.)

3.    What are ___________'s successes?

      (List all successes, no matter how small.)

4.    What are ___________'s greatest challenges?

      (List the areas in which your child has the greatest difficulties.)

5.    What supports are needed for ___________?

      (List supports that will help your child achieve his/her potential.)

6.    What are our dreams for ___________?

      (Describe your vision for your child's future, including both short-term and long-term goals.)

7.    Other helpful information.

      (List any pertinent information, including healthcare needs, not detailed elsewhere on the form.)

Adapted from: Collaborative Teams for Students with Severe Disabilities: Integrating Therapy and Educational Services, Beverly Rainforth, Ph.D., P.T., Jennifer York, Ph.D., P.T., Cathy Macdonald, M.A., C.C.C./S.L.P.

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SAMPLE

Positive Student Profile for Brian, age 11

1.    Who is BRIAN?

  • youngest child; Jaclyn's brother

  • likes to help in the kitchen (i.e.,  cooking)

  • favorite subjects are about the space shuttle and the earth

  • favorite TV show is Reading Rainbow

  • favorite color is red

  • likes to ride his bike

  • loves the beach

  • likes to take pictures, like his dad.

  • likes to visit the library to look at books

2.    What are BRIAN's strengths?

  • imitates well

  • is very helpful with routine  household chores

  • anticipates the needs of others (i.e.,  brings out the ingredients when cooking)

  • reminds others of details (forgotten shopping lists; lights to turn out)

  • likes to make people laugh, as well as laugh himself

  • understands what is being said

  • empathetic towards the emotions of others

3.    What are BRIAN's successes?

  • attends a general education education classroom

  • voted "most helpful" by his peers

  • participated in science fair, with his friend, learned about 'teamwork'

  • behaves appropriately in class and during lunch

  • good role model for others

  • is very good at operating a computer

  • can prepare his own breakfast and lunch

  • is learning to read

4.    What are BRIAN's greatest challenges?  

  • inability to communicate clearly, which causes high frustration level

  • dislikes unexpected change

  • difficulty completing an assignment without re-direction

  • reluctant to do things on demand

  • difficulty with math

5.    What supports are needed for BRIAN?

  • to observe and learn from 'typical' children

  • to have a circle of friends for support

  • to have a routine that is structured, yet flexible to allow for increased tolerance to change

  • a curriculum which can be modified where and when needed

  • use of assistive technology (i.e.,  computer), to expand ability to communicate

  • increased opportunities to be included in community activities

6.    What are our dreams for BRIAN?

Brian will:

  • have a circle of friends in his neighborhood

  • learn to read and write

  • expand his ability to communicate

  • eventually live independently

  • have meaningful employment

  • be an active participant in his community

7.    Other helpful information:

Due to the highly imitative skills common to children with Fragile X Syndrome, Brian needs to interact with typical peers as much as possible.   Brian's learning style is visually oriented, and he learns best through use of incidental learning, using information in ways that are functional, rather than through rote learning (for example, teaching how to add by counting apples in a store as opposed to adding numbers on a page).   Brian works best with short breaks in-between tasks.   When he gets upset, it is best to try and redirect him rather than become adversarial and force compliance.   Brian's great sense of humor can be very useful at doing that.   Brian has a great desire to be "part of the group" and does not like to be singled out.  Therefore, a cooperative learning environment works best for him.  

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SAMPLE

Positive Student Profile for Christina, age 19

1.    Who is Christina?

  • older sister "Kevin's younger than I am"

  • a "people person," friendly, personable

  • generous and helpful, "I can do that!"

  • situation comedies are a favorite TV pastime

  • Melrose Place fan (makes no plans Monday nights)

  • loves riding her mountain bike

  • loves going out to eat

  • loves getting together with her friends

  • swimming is a favorite thing to do

  • likes to shop at the mall

  • likes to prepare meals and bake

  • a real "party animal"

2.    What are Christina's strengths?

  • can clearly articulate her needs

  • natural ability to "draw" people to her and win them over

  • willingness to share with others

  • sensitivity to other people's feelings

  • always helpful, especially for money (typical teenager)

  • if a friend is in need, she's the first one to help and support

  • loves school

  • takes on a leadership role whenever possible

3.    What are Christina's successes?

  • can prepare food for herself

  • can call for help if necessary

  • rides mountain bike with confidence

  • uses bike for transportation

  • building trust in others towards her

  • responsible for younger children

  • becoming strong self-advocate

  • knowing what she likes and dislikes

  • has asked employers about job openings, requested application

4.    What are Christina's greatest challenges?

  • can be moody and stubborn at times

  • lack of stamina and endurance

  • being open minded about different jobs (employment)

  • not an outdoor person

  • not always a "team" player

  • difficulty getting up in the morning (working on it)

5.    What supports are needed for Christina?

  • to accept direction and supervision from others in authority

  • to learn how to access more of the community on her bike

  • to learn bike safety rules

  • a 'pat on the back' when successful

  • refinement of life skills for greater independence

  • developing money skills (saving it!)

  • improvement in the concept of time

  • building endurance (Nautilus, part-time job)

  • ongoing reading, writing and math

  • a solid transition plan with realistic goals and objectives

6.    What are our dreams for Christina ?

  • to have a job (preferably one working with children)

  • to own a home (blue with a deck)

  • to get married

  • to continue to have a "circle of friends"

  • to take vacations

  • to have choices about where she works and lives, friends, roommates, where she spends leisure time

  • identify longterm "supporters" and do estate planning to ensure Christina's choices are always considered

7.    Other helpful information:

      No other information at this time.

Adapted from: Collaborative Teams for Students with Severe Disabilities: Integrating Therapy and Educational Services, Beverly Rainforth, Ph.D., P.T., Jennifer York, Ph.D., P.T., Cathy Macdonald, M.A., C.C.C./S.L.P.  

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GOALS-AT-A-GLANCE

This form is to be filled out by the parent and shared with the team.

Under each heading below, enter a few major goals that you feel the IEP should address.

Academic:  

 

Social / Emotional / Behavioral:  

 

Communication:  

 

Daily Living:

   

Transition to Adulthood (No later than age 14):

   

Other:

 

Adapted from: Thousand, J.S., Project Director. The Homecoming Model: Educating Students Who Present Intensive Educational Challenges Within Regular Education Environments, September 1986.  

Classroom Activity Analysis Worksheet for ____________________

T=Teacher  A=Aide  RC=Resource Center  SP=Speech Pathologist  OT=Occupational Therapist  PT=Physical Therapist

This form can be completed by the parents and the multidisciplinary team to help you determine the nature of supports and adaptations needed to ensure success.

Classroom Activity

Appropriate for the Student?

Alternative Activities 
for Students

Skills in Need of Training

activity person responsible location/ activity as is with adapted materials with adapted current goals with personal assistance specific adaptations activity locational/ grouping person responsible materials  
yes no yes no yes no yes no
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SAMPLE

GOALS-AT-A-GLANCE for Brian, age 11

This form is to be filled out by the parent and shared with the team.

Under each heading below, enter a few major goals that you feel the IEP should address.

Academic:

  • increase sight word vocabulary

  • increase comprehension

  • improve handwriting

  • use computer as communication tool

  • add/subtract double digit numbers

Social / Emotional / Behavioral:

  • adapt to changes in routine

  • follow multi-step directions

  • develop strategies to calm himself

  • learn to work individually

  • improve social skills

  • increase interaction with peers

Communication:

  • ask for help appropriately

  • improve articulation

  • talk in sentences/short phrases

  • improve conversation skills

Daily Living:

  • tell time

  • make change

  • acquire small job responsibilities

Transition to Adulthood (No later than age 14):

  • expand circle of friends

  • increase exposure to community

Other:

  • learn to accept help from a variety of people

  • decrease tactile defensiveness and sensory deficits

  • improve fine motor skills

Classroom Activity Analysis Worksheet for        Brian           

T=Teacher  A=Aide  RC=Resource Center  SP=Speech Pathologist  OT=Occupational Therapist  PT=Physical Therapist

This form can be completed by the parents and the multidisciplinary team to help you determine the nature of supports and adaptations needed to ensure success.

Classroom Activity

Appropriate for the Student?

Alternative Activities
for Students

Skills in Need of Training

activity person responsible location/ activity as is with adapted materials with adapted current goals with personal assistance specific adaptations activity locational/ grouping person responsible materials  
yes no yes no yes no yes no
Recess T, P Yard             X   adapt games          
Open Time T class     X           use manipulat.          
Math RC, T RC         X                  
Lang Arts T, A class     X   X       use vocab. from reading          
Activity Time T, P, A class                 T, Th Speech Therapy Speech/ class SP   M, W, F
Science/ Social Studies T, P, A class         X   X   use of A for hands-on, for modified tests          
Recess/ Lunch Lunch, A, P class                 sight words          
Story Time T class     X                      
Reading RC, T RC         X                  
Art/ Music/ Library special special             X   flash cards, rebus, A to assist OT OT room OT   W
Gym gym, T gym                 Adapt PE M, T, Th, F OT class OT   T
Activity Time T, A, P class                 M, W, Th, F          
 

 

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Thousand, J.S. (Project Director), September 1986.  The Homecoming Model:  Educating students who present intensive educational challenges withinr regular education environments.

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IEP Goal - Activity Matrix   for ______________ This form can be completed by the parents and the multidisciplinary team to ensure that all the IEP goals are being addressed at some time during the school week.
IEP Goals                            
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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University of Vermont: Center for Developmental Disabilities

 

SAMPLE

IEP Goal - Activity Matrix   for       Brian      This form can be completed by the parents and the multidisciplinary team to ensure that all the IEP goals are being addressed at some time during the school week.
IEP Goals Open Time Math Lang Arts Activity Time Science Social Studies Lunch Recess Story Time Reading Art Music Library Gym Activity Time Bus
Increase sight word vocabulary X   X X X X   X X     X   X  
Increase comprehens.     X         X X     X      
Write letters     X X X X                  
Write name & address     X X                   X  
Add/ subtract X X     X                 X  
Tell time   X   X     X                
Identify coins X X         X             X  
Learn to dress X                            
Go to the bathroom independently X     X     X           X X  
Ask for help X           X   X X X X X X X
Improve articulation X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X
Improve conversation skills X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X
Adapt to change in routine X   X X X X X             X X
Learn to share and take turns X     X X   X X              
Develop strategies to calm himself X           X X       X X X  
Learn to work individually   X X X X X     X X X X X X  
Follow multi- step directions X X X X X X     X X X   X X  
Decrease tactile defensiveness       X     X           X X  
Improve social skills X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X
 

 

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University of Vermont: Center for Developmental Disabilities

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